I recently became a Twit on Twitter, and have been tweeting about my IT experiences with several new connections. In doing so, I came across a tweet about a contest to win some free training, specifically VMware View 5 Essentials from @TrainSignal – sweet!

Below is a screen capture of the tweet:


A jump over to the link provided in the tweet – explains that one or all of the below questions should be commented on in the blog post – in order to win. Instead of commenting on that blog, why not address ALL of the questions in my own blog article at IDS?!  Without further ado, let’s jump right in to the questions:

Why are Virtual Desktop technologies important nowadays, in your opinion?

Are you kidding me?!

If you are using a desktop computer, workstation at work or a laptop at home/work – you are well aware that technology moves so fast, updated versions are released as soon as you buy a “new” one. Not to mention the fact usually laptops are already configured with what the vendor or manufacturer thinks you should be using, not what is best, more efficient or fastest. More times than not, you are provided with what someone else thinks is best for the user. The reality is that only you – the user – knows what you need and if no one bothers to ask you, there can be a feelings of being trapped, having no options, or resignation, which all tend to lead to the dreaded “buyer’s remorse.”

When you get the chance to use a virtual desktop, you finally get a “tuned-in” desktop experience similar to or better than the user experience that you have on the desktop or laptop from Dell, HP, IBM, Lenovo, Gateway, Fujitsu, Acer and so on.

Virtual desktops offer a “tuned” experience because architects design an infrastructure and solution from the operating system in the virtual desktop, be it Windows XP to Windows 7; soon to be Windows 8, to the right amount of virtual CPUs (vCPUs), capacity of  guest memory, disk IOPS, network IOPS and everything else that you wouldn’t want to dive into the details of. A talented VDI Architect will consider every single component when designing  a virtual desktop solution because the user experience matters – there is no selling them on the experience “next time.” Chances are if you have a negative experience the first time, you will never use a virtual desktop again, nor will you have anything good to say when the topic comes up at your neighborhood barbecue or pool party.

The virtual desktop is imparitive because it drives the adoption of heads up displays (HUD) in vehicles, at home and the workplace, as well as slimmer interface tablet devices. Personally, when I think about the future of VDI I envision expandable OLED flex screens that will connect wirelessly to private or public cloud based virtual desktops with touch-based (scratch-resistant) interfaces that connect to private cloud based virtual desktops. The virtual desktop is the next  frontier, leaving behind the antiquated desktop experience that has been dictated to the consumer by vendors and manufacturers that simply does not give us what is needed the first time.

What are the most important features of VDI in your opinion?

Wow, the best features of VDI require a VIP membership into the exclusive VDI community. Seriously though, the users and IT Support staff are the last to know the most important features, but the users and IT Support are the first to be impacted when a solution is architected because those two groups of people are the most in lock-step with the desktop user experience.

The most effective way for me to leave a lasting impression is to lay out the most important features out in a couple of bullet statements:

  • Build a desktop in under 10 minutes –  how about 3-minutes?
  • Save personal settings and recover personal desktop settings, immediately after rebuilding a desktop.
  • Increased speed by which more CPU or RAM can be added to a virtual desktop.
  • Recovery from malware, spyware, junkware, adware, trojans, viruses, everything-ware – you can save money by just rebuilding in less than 10-minutes.
  • Access to the desktop from anywhere, securely.
  • It just works, like your car’s windshield!

That last point brings me to the most important part of VDI, that when architected, implemented and configured properly, it just works. My mantra in technology is “Technology should just work, so you don’t have to think about technology, freeing you up to just do what you do best!”

What should be improved in VDI technologies that are now on the market?

The best architects, solution providers and companies are the best because they understand the current value of a solution, in this case VDI, as well as the caveats and ask themselves this exact question. VDI has very important and incredibly functional features, but there is a ton of room for improvement.

So, let me answer this one question with two different hats on – one hat being a VDI Architect and the other hat being a VDI User. My improvement comments are based on the solution provided by VMware as I am most familiar with VMware View.  In my opinion, there is no other vendor in the current VDI market who can match the functionality, ease of management and speed that VMware has with the VMware View solution.

As a VDI Architect, I am looking for VMware to improve their VMware View product by addressing the below items:

  • Separate VMware View Composer from being on the VMware vCenter Server.
  • Make ALL of the VMware View infrastructure applications, appliances and components 64-bit.
  • Figure out and support Linux-based linked-clones. (The Ubuntu distribution is my preference.)
  • Get rid of the VMware View Client application – this is 2012.
  • Provide a fully functional web-based or even .hta based access to the VMware View virtual desktop that is secure and simple.
  • Build database compatibility with MySQL, so there is a robust FREE alternative to use.
  • Build Ruby-on-Rails access to manage the VMware View solution and database. Flash doesn’t work on my iPad!

As a VDI User, I am looking for VMware to improve:

  • Access to my virtual desktop, I hate installing another application that requires “administrator” rights.
  • Fix ThinPrint and peripheral compatibility or provide a clearer guide for what is supported in USB redirection.
  • Support USB 3.0 – I don’t care that my network or Internet connection cannot handle the speed – I want the sticker that says that the solution is USB 3.0 compatible and that I could get those speeds if I use a private cloud based VDI solution.
  • Tell me that you will be supporting the Thunderbolt interface and follow through within a year.
  • Support web-cams, I don’t want to know about why it is difficult, I just want it to work.
  • Support Ubuntu Linux-based virtual desktops.

In summary, you never know what you will find when using social media. The smallest of tweets or the longest of blog articles can elicit a thought that will provoke either a transformation in process or action in piloting a solution. If you are looking to pilot a VDI solution, look no further… shoot me an email or contact Integrated Data Storage to schedule a time to sit down and talk about how we can make technology “just work” in your datacenter!  Trust me when I say, your users will love you after you implement a VDI solution.

Photo Credit: colinkinner